“High School Shooting Teams Are Getting Wildly Popular”

I know I keep returning to this theme, but I find this an encouraging trend, even if it’s from the U.S. rather than Canada: “High School Shooting Teams Are Getting Wildly Popular — And the NRA Is Helping”

The Minnesota State High School Clay Target League championship bills itself as the largest shooting sports event in the world. With the bustling crowds and flood of corporate interest, it could be mistaken for, say, a scene on the NASCAR circuit, except that the stars are teenage boys and girls.

This is my favorite fact from the article:

As for safety: more than 70,000 students have fired 42 million shots since 2008. No one has reported a single injury, according to the league.

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“Participation on high school rifle teams is increasing”

I saw this item from the U.S. and thought it might be of interest here.  “Despite guns and schools debate, participation on high school rifle teams is increasing”

Long, an instructor at the Murrysville Gun Club for nearly two decades, extols the virtues of a sport that requires discipline and concentration and where anyone can participate.

Seven of the past 10 WPIAL [Western Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic League] individual champions are female.

“It’s a sport that’s starting to open up so it can accommodate all kinds of participants,” Long said. “It’s not a sport where you have to be athletically fit to do. You can be tall, skinny, short, fat — it doesn’t matter.

“You can be a boy or a girl. I like that it is a coed sport. Nobody’s singled out.”

“Deer Are a Menace”

When I first received this article, I thought it was a joke: “Deer Are a Menace and We Need to Kill a Lot More of Them”.  But no, he’s quite serious — there is a deer overpopulation problem in the U.S.

It’s for all of these [aforementioned] reasons that wildlife managers, ecologists, and even The Nature Conservancy have labeled deer, at their current populations, a grave threat to ecosystems all over the United States, and advocate measures to limit their spread, of which hunting is the most effective option.

Unfortunately, hunters are increasingly in short supply.

I can only speculate as to whether deer are a similar ecological threat in Canada, or whether we have a shortage of hunters.  It’s an interesting article; do read the whole thing.

“Meet the nine year old competitive shooter taking the world by storm”

From guns.com, a story of a remarkable young shooter in the U.S.:

Nine-year-old shooting sensation Alpha Addy has taken the gun world by storm with her impressive performances in competitions and displays on social media. The youth started shooting three years ago after seeing other young shooters shred steel on YouTube. But with firearms being relatively foreign to her parents, her godfather, Johnny Campos, took to training her.

I know I’ve met some young shooters in our area who are better shots with a rifle than I am.  And it’s nice to see the emphasis that Alpha Addy and her trainers place on safe gun handling.  Read the whole thing, and be sure to watch the video.  (You can also read the special youth issue of Sure Shots magazine on-line.)

“Patience. Discipline. Responsibility.”

Here’s another story from the U.S., just in time for our upcoming Youth Shoot: Advocates: School gun clubs teach discipline, not violence

Their classmates took to the streets to protest gun violence and to implore adults to restrict guns, seeming to forecast a generational shift in attitudes toward the Second Amendment. But at high school and college gun ranges around the country, these teens and young adults gather to practice shooting and talk about the positive influence firearms have had on their lives.

What do they say they learn? Patience. Discipline. Responsibility.

“Safety, discipline, and trust”

With our Youth Shoot about a month away, I thought this article from the New Yorker magazine, about teens in the U.S. becoming shooting enthusiasts, was relevant and respectful. (Notice the kids’ trigger discipline, too. They had good teachers.) — Brad

All but one were born in the decade after Columbine; like the student gun-control advocates activated by the recent massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, Florida, most are in their teens. But the children depicted here — hunters, target shooters, competitors in trap and skeet — occupy a parallel realm, where guns signify not danger, alienation, and the threat of death but safety, discipline, and trust.