“Patience. Discipline. Responsibility.”

Here’s another story from the U.S., just in time for our upcoming Youth Shoot: Advocates: School gun clubs teach discipline, not violence

Their classmates took to the streets to protest gun violence and to implore adults to restrict guns, seeming to forecast a generational shift in attitudes toward the Second Amendment. But at high school and college gun ranges around the country, these teens and young adults gather to practice shooting and talk about the positive influence firearms have had on their lives.

What do they say they learn? Patience. Discipline. Responsibility.

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“Safety, discipline, and trust”

With our Youth Shoot about a month away, I thought this article from the New Yorker magazine, about teens in the U.S. becoming shooting enthusiasts, was relevant and respectful. (Notice the kids’ trigger discipline, too. They had good teachers.) — Brad

All but one were born in the decade after Columbine; like the student gun-control advocates activated by the recent massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, Florida, most are in their teens. But the children depicted here — hunters, target shooters, competitors in trap and skeet — occupy a parallel realm, where guns signify not danger, alienation, and the threat of death but safety, discipline, and trust.

“How it feels to be a gun lover in Canada”

On November 24th, CBC Radio’s program “Out in the Open” carried an interview with John Evers of the Canadian Shooting Sports Association, on “How it feels to be a gun lover in Canada”.  It’s a 9 1/2 minute audio program that you can listen to on-line.

Loads of Canadians own them — legally — but hunter, sport shooter and all-round firearms enthusiast John Evers feels hated for his enjoyment of guns. He says Canadians, by and large, conflate guns with violence.

I found the interview to be reasonably fair and open-minded, and Evers to be quite a good spokesman.

“Armed and Reasonable”

I’m posting this because I thought it might be of general interest.  VICE magazine has just done a video story entitled “How To Buy a Gun In Canada: Armed and Reasonable.”  You can watch it on YouTube; it’s about 22 minutes long.  In it the reporter herself goes through the entire process of getting a PAL and buying her first gun.  I thought the video was fair and accurate, and gave a positive view of shooting as a popular sport.  — Brad